Bidean nan Bian is one of the most intersting mountains in Scotland the route here climbs the top Stob Coire nan Lochan which gaurds Bidean's summit from view then onto the summit. Once Bidian summit point has been climbed it's onto ridge to a col (also decent / escape point) onto the second summit Stob Coire Sgreamhach . Descent is via the col which drops steeply into the famous Coire Gabhail (Lost Vally) The view is excellent in all directions on a clear day, with views of Etive south westerly & a really good view of Aonach Eagach (Meall Dearg / Sgorr nam Fiannaidh) to Ben Nevis with the The Mamores in the forefront.]]> 180 Parking Area 150 Waypoint 135 Dot 125 Waypoint 180 Dot 275 Dot 350 Dot 450 Waypoint 650 Dot 650 Waypoint 800 Waypoint 950 Waypoint 1115 Bidean nam Bian on a connecting ridge. The mountain's ridge enclose north-facing corries that provide popular climbing venues. ]]> Waypoint 1000 Waypoint 1150 Stob Coire Sgreamhach, is classified as a separate Munro. The most noticeable features of Bidean nam Bian are the famous Three Sisters of Glen Coe, three peaks (in reality simply the steep ends of ridges) that face north into the Glen. Two of the sisters, Gearr Aonach (Short Ridge) and Aonach Dubh (Black Ridge) converge at Stob Coire nan Lochan, a 1115 m subsidiary peak of Bidean nam Bian that lies about 1 km to the northeast of the actual summit. The final, most easterly sister, Beinn Fhada, joins the Bidean nam Bian massif at the summit of Stob Coire Sgreamhach. Beinn Fhada is separated from Gearr Aonach by a glen known as Coire Gabhail. This translates to Glen of Capture, however the glen is more normally known as the Hidden or Lost Valley. Either name may be considered appropriate since it is believed that in former times the valley was used by members of Clan Macdonald to hide stolen cattle. The glen is ideal for this purpose since it is blocked by a glacial landslip, and from Glen Coe appears as a narrow gorge. In fact, once past the landslip the floor of the glen is wide and flat – ideal for cattle. The path from Glen Coe through the gorge into Coire Gabhail is a popular short walk (around 4 km in total), though it is rough in places. Bidean nam Bian may be ascended without much difficulty from various points within reach of the Clachaig Inn (Glencoe) but the usual approach is by An t'Sron when the ridge can be followed over Stob Coire nam Beith onto the summit. ]]> Summit 1080 Waypoint 1040 Waypoint 1000 Dot 985 Dot 940 Waypoint 975 Dot 1072 Bidean nam Bian massif on the southern side of Glen Coe. It is often considered a subsidiary peak of Bidean, though since the 1997 revision of Munros Tables it has been classified as a separate Munro. The mountain is usually climbed in conjunction with Bidean nam Bian, thus allowing for a traverse of the range. One of the most common routes from Glen Coe is to ascend the head of the Hidden Valley to reach the bealach between Stob Coire Sgreamhach and Bidean nam Bian. This valley is so-named due to its narrow lower reaches, which hide the broad floor fof the upper glen from view when seen from Glen Coe. The local Clan MacDonald are alleged to have used the glen to hide stolen cattle, hence the Gaelic name of Coire Gabhail, the Glen of Capture'. Another route of ascent is via Beinn Fhada, the most easterly of the famous Three Sisters of Glen Coe. This route also starts from the Hidden Valley, but then ascends steeply up the ridge that marks the southeastern edge of the glen. Stob Coire Sgreamhach may also be climbed from Glen Etive to the southeast by way of a steep rocky ridge. ]]> Summit 975 Waypoint 940 Waypoint 800 Dot 730 Dot 560 Waypoint 530 Dot 450 Dot 380 Waypoint 380 Dot 300 Parking Area 280 Dot 180 Dot 150 Dot 160 Dot 150 Dot 180 Dot 180 Parking Area 150 Waypoint 135 Dot 125 Waypoint 180 Dot 275 Dot 350 Dot 450 Waypoint 650 Dot 650 Waypoint 800 Waypoint 950 Waypoint 1115 Bidean nam Bian on a connecting ridge. The mountain's ridge enclose north-facing corries that provide popular climbing venues. ]]> Waypoint 1000 Waypoint 1150 Stob Coire Sgreamhach, is classified as a separate Munro. The most noticeable features of Bidean nam Bian are the famous Three Sisters of Glen Coe, three peaks (in reality simply the steep ends of ridges) that face north into the Glen. Two of the sisters, Gearr Aonach (Short Ridge) and Aonach Dubh (Black Ridge) converge at Stob Coire nan Lochan, a 1115 m subsidiary peak of Bidean nam Bian that lies about 1 km to the northeast of the actual summit. The final, most easterly sister, Beinn Fhada, joins the Bidean nam Bian massif at the summit of Stob Coire Sgreamhach. Beinn Fhada is separated from Gearr Aonach by a glen known as Coire Gabhail. This translates to Glen of Capture, however the glen is more normally known as the Hidden or Lost Valley. Either name may be considered appropriate since it is believed that in former times the valley was used by members of Clan Macdonald to hide stolen cattle. The glen is ideal for this purpose since it is blocked by a glacial landslip, and from Glen Coe appears as a narrow gorge. In fact, once past the landslip the floor of the glen is wide and flat – ideal for cattle. The path from Glen Coe through the gorge into Coire Gabhail is a popular short walk (around 4 km in total), though it is rough in places. Bidean nam Bian may be ascended without much difficulty from various points within reach of the Clachaig Inn (Glencoe) but the usual approach is by An t'Sron when the ridge can be followed over Stob Coire nam Beith onto the summit. ]]> Summit 1080 Waypoint 1040 Waypoint 1000 Dot 985 Dot 940 Waypoint 975 Dot 1072 Bidean nam Bian massif on the southern side of Glen Coe. It is often considered a subsidiary peak of Bidean, though since the 1997 revision of Munros Tables it has been classified as a separate Munro. The mountain is usually climbed in conjunction with Bidean nam Bian, thus allowing for a traverse of the range. One of the most common routes from Glen Coe is to ascend the head of the Hidden Valley to reach the bealach between Stob Coire Sgreamhach and Bidean nam Bian. This valley is so-named due to its narrow lower reaches, which hide the broad floor fof the upper glen from view when seen from Glen Coe. The local Clan MacDonald are alleged to have used the glen to hide stolen cattle, hence the Gaelic name of Coire Gabhail, the Glen of Capture'. Another route of ascent is via Beinn Fhada, the most easterly of the famous Three Sisters of Glen Coe. This route also starts from the Hidden Valley, but then ascends steeply up the ridge that marks the southeastern edge of the glen. Stob Coire Sgreamhach may also be climbed from Glen Etive to the southeast by way of a steep rocky ridge. ]]> Summit 975 Waypoint 940 Waypoint 800 Dot 730 Dot 560 Waypoint 530 Dot 450 Dot 380 Waypoint 380 Dot 300 Parking Area 280 Dot 180 Dot 150 Dot 160 Dot 150 Dot 180 Dot