Torridon region Tom na Gruagaich , Beinn Alligin - Sgurr Mhor are the easiest to climb and least threatening making it a fine first introduction to the pleasures of Torridonian hillwalking. Start from the Car Park by The Abhainn Coire Mhic Nobuil and take the path to the west of the bridge which heads up a good path onto the hillside and up into the huge gully of Coire nan Laogh. Once up here head onto the summit of Tom na Gruagaich from here your now on the ridge. Head along the ridge northwards keeping to the path which is eroded a head for heights is needed but all difficulties can be avoided with some simple scambling. From the col between the peaks head onto the summit of Beinn Alligin - Sgurr Mhor passing around Eag Dhubh na h-Eigheachd (Deep Gash of the Wailing). From the summit it's on to the easy scrambling section over the 3 peaks know as the Horns of Alligin To return descend steeply down An t-Sail Bheg's (last of the "Horns of Alligin" pinnacles) south south-western spur and join a stalkers path with returns to the car park A full traverse of the mountain is well within the bounds of a day's walk and offers some excellent ridge walking and splendid views of the area if you get a clear day as it's a pretty wet region. This route is often done in reverse starting with the horns first. ]]> 40 Trail Head 300 Dam 350 Dot 400 Dot 450 Dam 600 Waypoint 700 Dot 750 Dot 800 Dot 850 Waypoint 922 Torridon Region and sits on the south end of Ben Alligin mountain range. Ben Alligin lacks the mass of its eastern neigbours but lives up to it's name the usual translation is jewelled mountain especially on a clear day in early spring from the Shieldaig Road (A896) around NG865542 it looks a commanding elevation with great it's great gashed flanks and 3 horns with snowy tops. Tom na Gruagaich rises to the north directally from the head of the beautiful Loch Torridon formed mainly of terraced layered sandstone capped with sprinklings of quartzite. The hill rises from sea level with a lot of towering sandstone buttresses that from the ground make it look like no possible ascent exists up this complex little mountain. It's south-eastern slopes plunge steeply into the huge gully Coire' nan Laough and the north eastern flanks are even steeper forming the southern part on Tol a'Mhadaidh More (The Hollow of the wolf) which is the main corrie beneath Eag Dhubh on the south end of Sgurr Mhor. From the summit there is a very narrow ridge that steeply leads down onto col at 766m between Tom na Gruagaich & Sgurr Mhor. The usual ascent is from The Abhainn Coire Mhic Nobuil on a path to the west of the bridge which heads up a good path onto the hillside and up into the huge gully of Coire nan Laogh giving access to the summit point (marked with cairn and Trig Point) and ridge. Alternative access to the summit is from the northern ridge via the col from Sgurr Mhor. The panorma from the summit point of Tom na Gruagaich, and all along the ridge is arguably the finest in the Torridon opening uninterrupted of hills and sea around the western arc over to the isles , also superb views of its eastern sand stoned terraced neighbours. ]]> Summit 880 Dot 860 Waypoint 830 Dot 750 Waypoint 800 Waypoint 850 Dot 830 Dot 986 Torridon Region and sits on the north end of the Ben Alligin mountain range. It is easily recongnised as it has it has a distinctive gully on it's southeaster face known as Eag Dubh na h-Eigheachd (the black notch of the wailing) or Black Cleft and also the highest munro on the ridge. Ben Alligin lacks the mass of its eastern neighbours but lives up to it's name the usual translation is jewelled mountain especially on a clear day in early spring from the Shieldaig Road (A896) around NG865542 it looks a commanding elevation with great it's great gashed flanks and 3 horns with snowy tops. Sgurr Mhòr northern flanks rise impressively over Loch Toll nam Bias formed mainly of terraced layered sandstone capped with sprinklings of quartzite on the summit. Spurring to the east of Sgurr Mhòr's substantial summit cairn lie a series of rocky pinnacles known as the "Horns of Alligin" (also known as Na Rathanan 866 metres ) which is good summer scrambling if you've a head for height but if tackled in the winter months turns into a serious expedition. It's south-eastern slopes plunge steeply into Tol a'Mhadaidh More (The Hollow of the wolf) forming the northern part of Ben Allign's main corrie beneath Eag Dhubh with Tom na Gruagaich forming the southern part. Usual access the summit is from the southern ridge via the col from Tom na Gruagaich. Alternatively access can be gained via a left fork heading into Bealach a Chomhla around NG882601 then climbing rough mountainside of Na Rathanan's south eastern ridge and then over "The Horns". The Horns can be avoided by a very faint path which runs beneath the peaks on the south. The panorma from the summit point of Sgurr Mhòr, and all along the ridge is arguably the finest in the Torridon opening uninterrupted of hills and sea around the western arc over to the isles , also superb views of its eastern sand stoned terraced neighbours. ]]> Summit 900 Waypoint 750 Dot 700 Waypoint 860 Waypoint 800 Dot 760 Waypoint 730 Dot 650 Dot 500 Dot 350 Waypoint 285 Dot 263 Dot 201 Dot 150 Waypoint 144 Bridge 131 Dot 105 Waypoint 63 Parking Area 50 Dot 40 Trail Head 40 Trail Head 300 Dam 350 Dot 400 Dot 450 Dam 600 Waypoint 700 Dot 750 Dot 800 Dot 850 Waypoint 922 Torridon Region and sits on the south end of Ben Alligin mountain range. Ben Alligin lacks the mass of its eastern neigbours but lives up to it's name the usual translation is jewelled mountain especially on a clear day in early spring from the Shieldaig Road (A896) around NG865542 it looks a commanding elevation with great it's great gashed flanks and 3 horns with snowy tops. Tom na Gruagaich rises to the north directally from the head of the beautiful Loch Torridon formed mainly of terraced layered sandstone capped with sprinklings of quartzite. The hill rises from sea level with a lot of towering sandstone buttresses that from the ground make it look like no possible ascent exists up this complex little mountain. It's south-eastern slopes plunge steeply into the huge gully Coire' nan Laough and the north eastern flanks are even steeper forming the southern part on Tol a'Mhadaidh More (The Hollow of the wolf) which is the main corrie beneath Eag Dhubh on the south end of Sgurr Mhor. From the summit there is a very narrow ridge that steeply leads down onto col at 766m between Tom na Gruagaich & Sgurr Mhor. The usual ascent is from The Abhainn Coire Mhic Nobuil on a path to the west of the bridge which heads up a good path onto the hillside and up into the huge gully of Coire nan Laogh giving access to the summit point (marked with cairn and Trig Point) and ridge. Alternative access to the summit is from the northern ridge via the col from Sgurr Mhor. The panorma from the summit point of Tom na Gruagaich, and all along the ridge is arguably the finest in the Torridon opening uninterrupted of hills and sea around the western arc over to the isles , also superb views of its eastern sand stoned terraced neighbours. ]]> Summit 880 Dot 860 Waypoint 830 Dot 750 Waypoint 800 Waypoint 850 Dot 830 Dot 986 Torridon Region and sits on the north end of the Ben Alligin mountain range. It is easily recongnised as it has it has a distinctive gully on it's southeaster face known as Eag Dubh na h-Eigheachd (the black notch of the wailing) or Black Cleft and also the highest munro on the ridge. Ben Alligin lacks the mass of its eastern neighbours but lives up to it's name the usual translation is jewelled mountain especially on a clear day in early spring from the Shieldaig Road (A896) around NG865542 it looks a commanding elevation with great it's great gashed flanks and 3 horns with snowy tops. Sgurr Mhòr northern flanks rise impressively over Loch Toll nam Bias formed mainly of terraced layered sandstone capped with sprinklings of quartzite on the summit. Spurring to the east of Sgurr Mhòr's substantial summit cairn lie a series of rocky pinnacles known as the "Horns of Alligin" (also known as Na Rathanan 866 metres ) which is good summer scrambling if you've a head for height but if tackled in the winter months turns into a serious expedition. It's south-eastern slopes plunge steeply into Tol a'Mhadaidh More (The Hollow of the wolf) forming the northern part of Ben Allign's main corrie beneath Eag Dhubh with Tom na Gruagaich forming the southern part. Usual access the summit is from the southern ridge via the col from Tom na Gruagaich. Alternatively access can be gained via a left fork heading into Bealach a Chomhla around NG882601 then climbing rough mountainside of Na Rathanan's south eastern ridge and then over "The Horns". The Horns can be avoided by a very faint path which runs beneath the peaks on the south. The panorma from the summit point of Sgurr Mhòr, and all along the ridge is arguably the finest in the Torridon opening uninterrupted of hills and sea around the western arc over to the isles , also superb views of its eastern sand stoned terraced neighbours. ]]> Summit 900 Waypoint 750 Dot 700 Waypoint 860 Waypoint 800 Dot 760 Waypoint 730 Dot 650 Dot 500 Dot 350 Waypoint 285 Dot 263 Dot 201 Dot 150 Waypoint 144 Bridge 131 Dot 105 Waypoint 63 Parking Area 50 Dot 40 Trail Head