0 Trail Head 0 Waypoint 0 Waypoint 0 Waypoint 0 Creag Leacach is a fine sharp peak that sits on the end of a winding ridge to the south west of the munro Glas Maol. It has scree slopes that drop steeply to the west into Coire Bhathaich (corrie of the shelter). Creag Leacach is protected by steep craggy slopes in all directions except for the linking ridge to Glas Maol which is the usual route of choice following a small drystone wall which defines the route between the two munros. On the west side of Creag Leacach is the highest road in scotland the A93 that reaches 670 metres where a path leads to a col between Meall Gorm (759 metres) and the south-western top (943 metres) of Creag Leacach which acts as an alternative ascent route.

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0 Waypoint 0 Glas Maol is bare rounded mountain and highest point in the Mounth hills and can be best viewed from the Cairnwell road at the head of Glen Clunie near the Seann-spideal Bridge. Its western slopes and north-east corrie, the Coire Fionn, are scarred by the ski tows and snow fences from the Glen Shee ski centre. However, the contrasting eastern side has dropping in high cliffs into the Caenlochan Glen where the River Isla source is found. The most common route of ascent goes through the western slopes, starting from the highest point of the A93 road, the Cairnwell pass. This is the highest public road in Scotland; hence only around 400 metres of ascent is involved. The broad, flat summit is where the counties of Aberdeen, Angus and Perth meet and there is a fine view to be observed especially to the south and south-west. To the south of Glas Maol lies the munro Creag Leacach that's linked via a long ridge which is unusuall in the Mounth area having a fairly narrow summit ridge which drops steeply on both sides in long slopes of scree and boulders.

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0 Waypoint 0 Dot 0 Waypoint 0 Cairn of Claise is the tallest of a group of four munros which rise gently on the south western side of this high moorland plateau. The others munros are Carn an Tuirc (1019 metres), Tolmount (958 metres) and Tom Buidhe (957 metres). Its western side overlooks Garbh-Choire which has steep rocky slopes dropping down to the head of Glen Clunie a few kilometres north-east of the Cairnwell Pass, showing shallow grassy corries and rounded shoulders from the A93 road. To the north of the plateau stands the head of Glen Callater with a steep craggy face above this glen, and to the north-west is the rounded topped munro Tom Buidhe. The four can be climbed in a round tour from the head of Glen Clunie or even add Glas Maol & Creag Leacach for a longer outing.

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0 Waypoint 0 Tom Buidhe is the smallest of a group of four munros which rise gently on the south eastern side of this high moorland plateau. The others munros are Cairn of Claise (1064 metres) , Carn an Tuirc (1019 metres), and Tolmount (958 metres). Tom Buidhe's summit is rounded and has gentle slopes around it but to the south via Caenlochan Glen are the cliffs of Canness Glen which are steep & craggy. "Jock's Road" is an old drove way linking Braemar and Glen Clova from the eastern side gives popular access to Tom Buidhe's summit but it's propably easier via the west from Cairn of Claise The four can be climbed in a round tour from the head of Glen Clunie or even add Glas Maol & Creag Leacach for a longer outing.

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0 Tolmount is a munro of a group of four and rises gently on the north eastern side of this high moorland plateau. The others munros in the group are Cairn of Claise (1064 metres) south-westerly, Carn an Tuirc (1019 metres) eaterly , and Tom Buidhe (957 metres) southerly. The north-western face is steep and rocky forming an arc above Glen Callater below. All other sides are gentle and link to the 3 other munros on the plateau. The four can be climbed in a round tour from the head of Glen Clunie or even add Glas Maol & Creag Leacach for a longer outing.

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0 Dot 0 Waypoint 0 Carn an Tuirc is a munro which is part a group of four, and rises gently on the north western side of this high moorland plateau. The others munros in the group are Cairn of Claise (1064 metres) , Tolmount (958 metres), and Tom Buidhe (957 metres). The eastern side of this flat topped munro lie craggy slopes dropping down into Glen Callater. Also to the east approximately 3km sits the munro Tolmount which can be accessed easily. From Glen Callater which is to the north a bulldozed track climbs on to the long east twisting northern ridge upto an altitude of 940 metres which is on the north eastern edge of Carn an Tuirc. On the western and southern sides of this munro are steep slopes which drop down to the Allt a' Gharbh Choire below. From the northern slopes a path leads westerly down to Allt a' Gharbh Choire and eventually to the A92 road in Glen Clunie just 2km north of the Glen Shee Ski Resort. On the ridge that runs to the south-east of Carn an Tuirc the munro Cairn of Claise is linked via a col. The four can be climbed in a round tour from the head of Glen Clunie or even add Glas Maol & Creag Leacach for a longer outing.

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0 Waypoint 0 Parking Area 0 Dot 0 Dot 0 Trail Head 0 Dot 0 Dot 0 Dot 0 Dot 0 Trail Head 0 Waypoint 0 Waypoint 0 Waypoint 0 Creag Leacach is a fine sharp peak that sits on the end of a winding ridge to the south west of the munro Glas Maol. It has scree slopes that drop steeply to the west into Coire Bhathaich (corrie of the shelter). Creag Leacach is protected by steep craggy slopes in all directions except for the linking ridge to Glas Maol which is the usual route of choice following a small drystone wall which defines the route between the two munros. On the west side of Creag Leacach is the highest road in scotland the A93 that reaches 670 metres where a path leads to a col between Meall Gorm (759 metres) and the south-western top (943 metres) of Creag Leacach which acts as an alternative ascent route.

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0 Waypoint 0 Glas Maol is bare rounded mountain and highest point in the Mounth hills and can be best viewed from the Cairnwell road at the head of Glen Clunie near the Seann-spideal Bridge. Its western slopes and north-east corrie, the Coire Fionn, are scarred by the ski tows and snow fences from the Glen Shee ski centre. However, the contrasting eastern side has dropping in high cliffs into the Caenlochan Glen where the River Isla source is found. The most common route of ascent goes through the western slopes, starting from the highest point of the A93 road, the Cairnwell pass. This is the highest public road in Scotland; hence only around 400 metres of ascent is involved. The broad, flat summit is where the counties of Aberdeen, Angus and Perth meet and there is a fine view to be observed especially to the south and south-west. To the south of Glas Maol lies the munro Creag Leacach that's linked via a long ridge which is unusuall in the Mounth area having a fairly narrow summit ridge which drops steeply on both sides in long slopes of scree and boulders.

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0 Waypoint 0 Dot 0 Waypoint 0 Cairn of Claise is the tallest of a group of four munros which rise gently on the south western side of this high moorland plateau. The others munros are Carn an Tuirc (1019 metres), Tolmount (958 metres) and Tom Buidhe (957 metres). Its western side overlooks Garbh-Choire which has steep rocky slopes dropping down to the head of Glen Clunie a few kilometres north-east of the Cairnwell Pass, showing shallow grassy corries and rounded shoulders from the A93 road. To the north of the plateau stands the head of Glen Callater with a steep craggy face above this glen, and to the north-west is the rounded topped munro Tom Buidhe. The four can be climbed in a round tour from the head of Glen Clunie or even add Glas Maol & Creag Leacach for a longer outing.

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0 Waypoint 0 Tom Buidhe is the smallest of a group of four munros which rise gently on the south eastern side of this high moorland plateau. The others munros are Cairn of Claise (1064 metres) , Carn an Tuirc (1019 metres), and Tolmount (958 metres). Tom Buidhe's summit is rounded and has gentle slopes around it but to the south via Caenlochan Glen are the cliffs of Canness Glen which are steep & craggy. "Jock's Road" is an old drove way linking Braemar and Glen Clova from the eastern side gives popular access to Tom Buidhe's summit but it's propably easier via the west from Cairn of Claise The four can be climbed in a round tour from the head of Glen Clunie or even add Glas Maol & Creag Leacach for a longer outing.

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0 Tolmount is a munro of a group of four and rises gently on the north eastern side of this high moorland plateau. The others munros in the group are Cairn of Claise (1064 metres) south-westerly, Carn an Tuirc (1019 metres) eaterly , and Tom Buidhe (957 metres) southerly. The north-western face is steep and rocky forming an arc above Glen Callater below. All other sides are gentle and link to the 3 other munros on the plateau. The four can be climbed in a round tour from the head of Glen Clunie or even add Glas Maol & Creag Leacach for a longer outing.

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0 Dot 0 Waypoint 0 Carn an Tuirc is a munro which is part a group of four, and rises gently on the north western side of this high moorland plateau. The others munros in the group are Cairn of Claise (1064 metres) , Tolmount (958 metres), and Tom Buidhe (957 metres). The eastern side of this flat topped munro lie craggy slopes dropping down into Glen Callater. Also to the east approximately 3km sits the munro Tolmount which can be accessed easily. From Glen Callater which is to the north a bulldozed track climbs on to the long east twisting northern ridge upto an altitude of 940 metres which is on the north eastern edge of Carn an Tuirc. On the western and southern sides of this munro are steep slopes which drop down to the Allt a' Gharbh Choire below. From the northern slopes a path leads westerly down to Allt a' Gharbh Choire and eventually to the A92 road in Glen Clunie just 2km north of the Glen Shee Ski Resort. On the ridge that runs to the south-east of Carn an Tuirc the munro Cairn of Claise is linked via a col. The four can be climbed in a round tour from the head of Glen Clunie or even add Glas Maol & Creag Leacach for a longer outing.

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